The Coxwood Story

Ezariah Coxwood: our park's original settler.

Ezariah Coxwood: our park’s original settler.

In 1802, there was a man. A man with a vision. A man who stopped and gazed around the virgin soil upon which he found himself and declared, in a soft whisper, “I am home.”

This man was Ezariah Coxwood, the original settler of the land which would become Coxwood History Fun Park. Through backbreaking labour and wholesome family values, Ezariah and his wife Jubiliah turned the scraggly, overgrown woods into a respectable working farm.

The Coxwood lands, prior to settlement.

The Coxwood lands, prior to settlement.

Wilderness tamed: the Coxwood Farm ca. 1867.

Wilderness tamed: the Coxwood Farm ca. 1867.

This farmland remained in the Coxwood family through the generations until 1950, when it was sold by Ezariah’s descendant: Zebidiah.

Upon hearing that the Coxwood family lands had been sold, the witch who has squatted on the property since 1805 gave Zebidiah a great whack with her blackthorn cane, and proceeded to curse the land and all who dwelt thereon.

The old Coxwood farm then lay vacant and unloved until 1966, when the Management of the newly-established Coxwood History Fun Park acquired the Wench and Boggs Inn, and moved it to the site. There, the newly-Christened “Historic Inn” joined the Ezariah Coxwood’s original Barn and Gentleman’s House to create the nucleus of Coxwood History Fun Park.

The Gentleman's House

The Gentleman’s House

The Wench and Boggs, on its original site, ca. 1850.

The Wench and Boggs, on its original site, ca. 1850.

Over the next twenty years, this nucleus expanded with other acquisitions: the Schoolhouse, Mill, Blacksmith’s Shop, Doctor’s House, General Store, Silversmith’s Shop, and Slaughterhouse, to name but a few. Together, these restored buildings form Coxwood History Fun Park in its current incarnation: a place where the past lives on, and the quaint traditions of an old-fashioned time stand bravely in the face of encroaching modernity.

We hope you come visit us, and slip back into our warm, golden haze of nostalgia.

 

All images on this page courtesy The British Library.

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